Inspired by the ancient and weathered Australian landscape, Kate Briscoe mixes sand into paint to create eroded geological cross sections and striations that capture the substance and sensuality of the earth. For Kate, landforms tell stories.
Geological cross sections and sediment layers record past events, catastrophes, the shift and flow of elemental forces over time. Although these works reference the geology of specific areas across the continent-from Arnhem Land and The Kimberly to the South coast of NSW-they are essentially abstract improvisations of texture and colour that facilitate a rich visual experience for the viewer and convey the ‘essence’ of place.

‘Rockfall’ series 2016
These works continue my exploration of the Kimberley, focussing here on Emma Gorge.
Emma Gorge is a steep gorge whose walls display the many layers of rock formations from different periods of geological time. Where these rocks have broken off and tumbled into the gorge, a mixture of forms and shapes of rock can be seen jumbled together.

The conceptual difference from the earlier works lies with the perspective, in the previous body of work the compositions preferenced viewing the gorges and cliffs in terms of layers, strata and splits. Here with the Rockfalls series I am observing the pieces of rock from different layers where they have fallen and jumbled together.
I started this series with a group of monotypes; Marnling Press will publish some of these in a book to be launched in Sydney in August 2016.



 

Studio-photo-Andre-Smits

  

                     

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

        

  
 

Studio-photo-Andre-Smits